Skip to content
Showing you results for "Gwynedd"

Top recommendations from locals

From sightseeing to hidden gems, find out what makes the city unique with the help of the locals who know it best.
Other Great Outdoors
“Based in stunning North Wales there's 3 locations to visit full of adventures for all ages. World's Fastest Zip Line. New Velocity 2 Experience. Book Online Today. The Ultimate Adventure. Unique Experience. Fun For The Whole Family.”
  • 81 locals recommend
Castle
“Its a good day out if the weather is ok. Conwy Castle (Welsh: Castell Conwy) is a fortification in Conwy, located in North Wales. It was built by Edward I, during his conquest of Wales, between 1283 and 1289. Constructed as part of a wider project to create the walled town of Conwy, the combined defences cost around £15,000, a huge sum for the period. Over the next few centuries, the castle played an important part in several wars. It withstood the siege of Madog ap Llywelyn in the winter of 1294–95, acted as a temporary haven for Richard II in 1399 and was held for several months by forces loyal to Owain Glyndŵr in 1401. ”
  • 57 locals recommend
Park
“Snowdonia National Park is famous for his undisturbed and outstanding beauty. Only 1 hour drive away it is right on our doorstep for a great day out, exploring the outdoors. hiking, walking or Zipwire experience.”
  • 65 locals recommend
Athletics & Sports
“There are few places on earth where you can surf inland, but as luck would have it one of them is in North Wales. Adventure Parc Snowdonia is home to our world-first surf lagoon and the only guaranteed surf break in the UK. But that’s not all! Check out our brand-new indoor and outdoor activities, including our brand-new Adrenaline Indoors facility and Explore Outdoors adventures. ”
  • 63 locals recommend
Other Great Outdoors
“FROM ZIP WORLD FFOREST 'In a stunning woodland setting nestled in the North Wales Conwy Valley, close to the iconic Snowdonia village of Betws y Coed, a host of forest adventures and foodie delights await. With adventures to keep the whole family busy all day, choose from the Fforest Coaster, the UK’s only alpine coaster of its kind, bouncing fun on Treetop Nets or zip line and adventure courses high in the trees on Tree Hoppers or Zip Safari – plus you could try Europe’s highest giant swing, Skyride, if you dare!' ”
  • 43 locals recommend
Castle
“If you've never seen a castle up close, this is your chance ! Walk in and around the walls of Caernarfon Castle. A must.”
  • 45 locals recommend
Mountain
“Snowdon is 3500ft and depending on levels of fitness it is a great walk. The views are stunning but on a misty day it can be very cold towards the top. Please be advised that you do need really good walking shoes as the ground under foot can be uneven. For those less able or if you would like to go to the summit with the least effort take the train but you will need to book in advance as this is very popular. ”
  • 51 locals recommend
Other Great Outdoors
“Zip wire and underground giant trampoline for those of you who enjoy an adrenaline rush!”
  • 36 locals recommend
Park
$$
“Great for a walk and fresh air to see the beautiful flowers. Lots going on for children during school holidays. Entrance price if you don’t have a national trust card - Adult £14.00 child £7.00.”
  • 28 locals recommend
Other Great Outdoors
“FROM ZIP WORLD SLATE CAVERNS 'Zip World Slate Caverns is home to Europe's largest zipping zone (Titan), an underground nets adventure where young and old alike can bounce and jump to their hearts' content (Bounce Below), and a subterranean playground complete with zip lines, via ferrata and rope bridges (Caverns).'”
  • 30 locals recommend
Castle
“Caernarfon Castle is recognised around the world as one of the greatest buildings of the Middle Ages. This fortress-palace on the banks of the River Seiont is grouped with Edward I’s other castles at Conwy, Beaumaris and Harlech as a World Heritage Site. But for sheer scale and architectural drama Caernarfon stands alone. Here Edward and his military architect Master James of St George erected a castle, town walls and a quay all at the same time. This gigantic building project eventually took 47 years and cost a staggering £25,000. The castle was born out of bitter war with Welsh princes. So of course its immense curtain walls and daunting King’s Gate were designed to withstand assault. But the polygonal towers, eagle statues and multi-coloured masonry sent a more subtle message. These echoed imperial Roman architecture, especially the walls of Constantinople. They also recalled the Welsh myth of Macsen Wledig, who dreamed of a great fort at the mouth of a river – ‘the fairest that man ever saw’. So Caernarfon is a castle of dreams. A legend brought to life. Even after 700 years it still stirs the imagination like no other Welsh castle.”
  • 26 locals recommend
Nature
“For fans of narrow gauge railways and also an interesting way to see the stunning scenery of Snowdonia”
  • 21 locals recommend
Castle
“Beaumaris Castle (Welsh: Castell Biwmares), in Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales, was built as part of Edward I's campaign to conquer north Wales after 1282. Plans were probably first made to construct the castle in 1284, but this was delayed due to lack of funds and work only began in 1295 following the Madog ap Llywelyn uprising. A substantial workforce was employed in the initial years under the direction of James of St George. Edward's invasion of Scotland soon diverted funding from the project, however, and work stopped, only recommencing after an invasion scare in 1306. When work finally ceased around 1330 a total of £15,000 had been spent, a huge sum for the period, but the castle remained incomplete. Beaumaris Castle was taken by Welsh forces in 1403 during the rebellion of Owain Glyndŵr, but recaptured by royal forces in 1405. Following the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by forces loyal to Charles I, holding out until 1646 when it surrendered to the Parliamentary armies. Despite forming part of a local royalist rebellion in 1648, the castle escaped slighting and was garrisoned by Parliament, but fell into ruin around 1660, eventually forming part of a stately home and park in the 19th century. In the 21st century, the ruined castle is still a tourist attraction. Historian Arnold Taylor described Beaumaris Castle as Britain's "most perfect example of symmetrical concentric planning". The fortification is built of local stone, with a moated outer ward guarded by twelve towers and two gatehouses, overlooked by an inner ward with two large, D-shaped gatehouses and six massive towers. The inner ward was designed to contain ranges of domestic buildings and accommodation able to support two major households. The south gate could be reached by ship, allowing the castle to be directly supplied by sea. UNESCO considers Beaumaris to be one of "the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe", and it is classed as a World Heritage site.”
  • 24 locals recommend
Restaurant
$$
“One of our favourites 15 minutes drive away. Fabulous sea views and great food and service.”
  • 35 locals recommend
Landmark
“Visit the steepest hill in the uk visit the castle walk on the beach play golf”
  • 30 locals recommend
Nature
“Snowdonia offers amazing views, challenging trail walks, steam train rides, zip wires etc. Something for everyone who enjoys out door pursuits.”
  • 15 locals recommend

Top restaurants

Restaurant
“One of our favourites 15 minutes drive away. Fabulous sea views and great food and service.”
  • 35 locals recommend
Restaurant
“Menai Bridge - LL59 5EY - 01248 716714 With sister restaurants in both Cricceth and Llandudno, these guys are taking North Wales by storm! Their unique Anglesey venue overlooks the Straits – and all three have gorgeous seaside themed décor. Their ethos is to celebrate the local produce, character & natural beauty of the area – and they do so to perfection! Specialising in homemade pizzas - as well as seafood and locally sourced meat – this place has fabulous sea-views, sells its own products (including sauces, luxury hampers, clothing & Welsh slate ‘boards’ etc) - and has lots of ‘foodie’ events going on throughout the year – including bread, baking & pizza making workshops, wine, gin & whisky nights – as well as food & film evenings – so check their website for details! Open from lunch until late every day of the week – but out of season it’s safer to ring ahead! Booking is advisable during weekends and busy periods. ”
  • 29 locals recommend
Pub
“The Black Boy Inn offers a warm welcome and good food to those in search of a relaxed and traditionally Welsh experience and environment.”
  • 26 locals recommend
English Restaurant
“If you are happy to go by car, then check out Marram Grass Restaurant. Great food by a Great British Menu finalist Ellis Barrie, all the food locally sourced. (20 minutes by car)”
  • 23 locals recommend
Theatre
“The Pontio centre offers an exciting and unique blend of Arts and Culture, Innovation, Education and Community. Lot's going on, the centre boasts a theatre, cinema, numerous dining areas, and interactive lecture rooms, ”
  • 18 locals recommend
Restaurant
“Lovely Italian restaurant with a nice vibe. Very good food. Booking recommended”
  • 14 locals recommend
Bistro
“Trearddur Bay - LL65 2UP - 01407 860008 Serves drinks, lunch & supper - with wonderful sea views over the bay (both inside & out); the best in Trearddur! What’s more, it boasts a speciality gin bar! We’d recommend booking in advance, especially during busy periods! Located smack-bang next door to Trearddur’s RNLI Station, you might even see a rescue/practice launch taking place. Dolphins & seals are known to come into the bay, which is also famous for its Sailing Club and (summertime) regattas. With its glamorous décor, gorgeous seaside vistas and locally inspired menu - this is a place you’d be mad to miss out on! There’s a small amount of free parking outside, with more close-by in Trearddur’s smaller P&D parking area - as well as the main one. Usually open daily from 12pm throughout the year. Last food orders at 9pm. Dogs welcome outside - where there's another bar when the weather's nice!”
  • 12 locals recommend
Gastropub
“Rhoscolyn - LL65 2NJ - 01407 740317 Open for coffee, lunch, nibbles, supper & drinks - from 12pm daily - with food-orders until 9pm, and normal pub hours usually applying otherwise. Gorgeous sea views, stylish, with an open fire in winter – you can’t really go wrong with the popular White Eagle! Dogs are allowed inside in their ‘snug’ area - and outside on the decking. It’s family friendly, has a beer-garden - and there are wonderful walking opportunities in the area too! Rhoscolyn’s main beach is just down the lane – so it’s perfect for some ‘après sea’. Lots of their meals include local produce – e.g. fresh seafood & welsh lamb/beef. They also host events throughout the year – so keep an eye on their website/Facebook pages! During school holidays, at weekends and on special occasions, if you want to eat there we’d recommend booking in advance – the same goes for larger groups! They’re used to muddy/sandy boots/paws - but it’s also a lovely place to go for a special evening-out. ”
  • 13 locals recommend

Get to know Gwynedd

Explore more on Airbnb