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Showing you results for "Kenora, Unorganized, ON"

Top recommendations from locals

From sightseeing to hidden gems, find out what makes the city unique with the help of the locals who know it best.

Brewery
$$
“Great food and atmosphere here! Highly recommend the beer battered walleye for a real taste of the area. Definitely a place to hit while in Kenora. ”
  • 7 locals recommend
Park
“Easy to follow signage along paths . Easy hike , lake view, lookouts . Well marked . ”
  • 5 locals recommend
Point of Interest
  • 2 locals recommend
Park
“A busier trail system, frequented by dog walkers, trail runners, and mountain bikers, you could spend an entire day exploring here. ”
  • 3 locals recommend
Greek Restaurant
$$
  • 1 local recommends
Garden
“Local business providing tours, courses and rentals for a variety of activities including Canoeing, Kayaking, SUP and diving. ”
  • 2 locals recommend
History Museum
“Lake of the Woods Museum. The multi-award-winning Lake of the Woods Museum is considered by the CAA Magazine to be “one of the coolest little museums in Canada.” The history of the area is presented through three levels of permanent and temporary exhibits and engaging educational programming.”
  • 2 locals recommend
Grocery or Supermarket
“Great place to grab all of your groceries for your trip. They are very helpful!”
  • 1 local recommends
Bistro
$$
“Great cooking, quality food, stir frys, salmon,steak, meal sized salads, home cooked special dishes with plenty flavour . Wonderful homemade desserts. The owner Brenda oversees the food and often visits all the tables. ”
  • 2 locals recommend
Park
“Gorgous views of the islands. Campfires. Awesome trails. Grab a site on the lake and you wont be disappointed!! Love it here.”
  • 3 locals recommend
Restaurant
  • 1 local recommends
Travel Agency
  • 1 local recommends
Lodging
  • 1 local recommends
Administrative Area Level 1
“Ontario (Listeni/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/) is one of the ten provinces of Canada, located in east-central Canada.[7][8] It is Canada's most populous province[9] by a large margin, accounting for nearly 40 percent[10] of all Canadians, and is the second largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included.[3] It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto.[11] Ontario is bordered by the province of Manitoba to the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay to the north, and Quebec to the east and northeast, and to the south by the US states of (from west to east) Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. All of Ontario's 2,700 km (1,678 mi) border with the United States follows inland waterways: from the west at Lake of the Woods, eastward along the major rivers and lakes of the Great Lakes/Saint Lawrence River drainage system. These are the Rainy River, the Pigeon River, Lake Superior, the St. Marys River, Lake Huron, the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, the Detroit River, Lake Erie, the Niagara River, Lake Ontario and along the St. Lawrence River from Kingston, Ontario, to the Quebec boundary just east of Cornwall, Ontario. Ontario is sometimes conceptually divided into two regions, Northern Ontario and Southern Ontario. The great majority of Ontario's population and arable land is located in the south. In contrast, the larger, northern part of Ontario is sparsely populated with cold winters and is heavily forested. The province is named after Lake Ontario, a term thought to be derived from Ontarí:io, a Huron (Wyandot) word meaning "great lake",[12] or possibly skanadario, which means "beautiful water" in the Iroquoian languages.[13] Ontario has about 250,000 freshwater lakes. The province consists of three main geographical regions: The thinly populated Canadian Shield in the northwestern and central portions, which comprises over half the land area of Ontario. Although this area mostly does not support agriculture, it is rich in minerals and in part covered by the Central and Midwestern Canadian Shield forests, studded with lakes and rivers. Northern Ontario is subdivided into two sub-regions: Northwestern Ontario and Northeastern Ontario. The virtually unpopulated Hudson Bay Lowlands in the extreme north and northeast, mainly swampy and sparsely forested. Southern Ontario which is further sub-divided into four regions; Central Ontario (although not actually the province's geographic centre), Eastern Ontario, Golden Horseshoe and Southwestern Ontario (parts of which were formerly referred to as Western Ontario). Despite the absence of any mountainous terrain in the province, there are large areas of uplands, particularly within the Canadian Shield which traverses the province from northwest to southeast and also above the Niagara Escarpment which crosses the south. The highest point is Ishpatina Ridge at 693 metres (2,274 ft) above sea level located in Temagami, Northeastern Ontario. In the south, elevations of over 500 m (1,640.42 ft) are surpassed near Collingwood, above the Blue Mountains in the Dundalk Highlands and in hilltops near the Madawaska River in Renfrew County. The Carolinian forest zone covers most of the southwestern region of the province. The temperate and fertile Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence Valley in the south is part of the Eastern Great Lakes lowland forests ecoregion where the forest has now been largely replaced by agriculture, industrial and urban development. A well-known geographic feature is Niagara Falls, part of the Niagara Escarpment. The Saint Lawrence Seaway allows navigation to and from the Atlantic Ocean as far inland as Thunder Bay in Northwestern Ontario. Northern Ontario occupies roughly 87 percent of the surface area of the province; conversely Southern Ontario contains 94 percent of the population. Point Pelee is a peninsula of Lake Erie in southwestern Ontario (near Windsor and Detroit, Michigan) that is the southernmost extent of Canada's mainland. Pelee Island and Middle Island in Lake Erie extend slightly farther. All are south of 42°N – slightly farther south than the northern border of California. The climate of Ontario varies by season and location.[15] It is affected by three air sources: cold, dry, arctic air from the north (dominant factor during the winter months, and for a longer part of the year in far northern Ontario); Pacific polar air crossing in from the western Canadian Prairies/US Northern Plains; and warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.[16] The effects of these major air masses on temperature and precipitation depend mainly on latitude, proximity to major bodies of water and to a small extent, terrain relief.[16] In general, most of Ontario's climate is classified as humid continental.[16] Ontario has three main climatic regions. The surrounding Great Lakes greatly influ”
  • 2 locals recommend
Bicycle Store
“Feel like getting on the water? (NOTE: Kenora is surrounded WATER.) Check out The Hardware Co. for kayak and SUP rentals. They also sell outdoor gear, bikes, skis… They pretty much have it all! ”
  • 2 locals recommend